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Corona Virus Update

Buying from us

We continue to operate here at Silbury Coins in these unprecedented times, albeit working from home. You can still buy items on our website as usual. Shipping may take a little longer as we are making fewer trips to the post office and some postal services are operating a reduced service. We will keep you updated at every step of the order/shipping process. If you have any questions regarding shipping you can contact Lucy (lucy@silburycoins.com) or John (info@silburycoins.com) and they will be happy to help. 

We are closely monitoring the postal service and will update on any changes, if you'd prefer we can safely store your items until a later date, just ask.

Selling to us

We are still buying single items and collections by post. If you’d prefer you can send pictures via email, phone or WhatsApp for a rough valuation first. To sell items please send them to us using Royal Mail Special Delivery (available at any post office, both insured and tracked). Please package well and include your contact details, we will be in touch when your package arrives with an exact price. If this is acceptable we will pay you by direct bank transfer, if not we will return the items to you via the same method of post.

Email: info@silburycoins.com Phone 01242 898107 / 07793 676309 WhatsApp 07793 676309 Post Po Box 281, Cirencester, Glos, GL7 9ET.

We wish all of our customers & friends well at this difficult time and we look forward to hearing from new and old friends over the coming months.

Republican 290-41BC

Roman Republican 290-41BC coins for sale. Although Rome was founded in the 8th century BC, a true Roman coinage did not appear before the 3rd century BC. Until the 5th century BC, trade relied on rough, unworked bronze used by weight. During the 4th century BC, contact with Greek cities, who were already using coins, brought about the requirement for a Roman currency. True Roman coins were first produced in 269AD in the form of the ‘Aes Grave’, a series of cast bronze coins, ranging from the ‘as’ to the ‘uncia’, with the obverse depicting a deity and the reverse a ship’s prow. At the same time struck silver issues appeared, based on the Greek silver didrachm. By 190BC, the Roman coinage consisted principally of silver with Latin inscriptions and was struck in Rome and other authorised mints. The bronze coinage was reduced in standard, and therefore size, allowing it also to be struck rather than cast. A relationship between bronze and silver first occurred around 211BC with the introduction of the silver denarius, equivalent to ten asses. Early types typically show the head of Roma on the obverse and the Dioscuri (the twins Castor & Pollox), on the reverse. Around the same time, the sestertius was introduced as a small silver coin valued at a quarter of a denarius, together with the quinarius (half denarius). As the Roman Empire expanded, local currencies were also used, including gold, but Roman coinage issued in gold was exceptional for the period. In 89BC the sestertius replaced the bronze ‘as’ as an accounting unit. After 80BC, striking in bronze was discontinued until the time of Julius Caesar.

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Nero Gold Aureus 54-68AD Rome
£1,800.00
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