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Corona Virus Update

Buying from us

We continue to operate here at Silbury Coins in these unprecedented times, albeit working from home. You can still buy items on our website as usual. Shipping may take a little longer as we are making fewer trips to the post office and some postal services are operating a reduced service. We will keep you updated at every step of the order/shipping process. If you have any questions regarding shipping you can contact Lucy (lucy@silburycoins.com) or John (info@silburycoins.com) and they will be happy to help. 

We are closely monitoring the postal service and will update on any changes, if you'd prefer we can safely store your items until a later date, just ask.

Selling to us

We are still buying single items and collections by post. If you’d prefer you can send pictures via email, phone or WhatsApp for a rough valuation first. To sell items please send them to us using Royal Mail Special Delivery (available at any post office, both insured and tracked). Please package well and include your contact details, we will be in touch when your package arrives with an exact price. If this is acceptable we will pay you by direct bank transfer, if not we will return the items to you via the same method of post.

Email: info@silburycoins.com Phone 01242 898107 / 07793 676309 WhatsApp 07793 676309 Post Po Box 281, Cirencester, Glos, GL7 9ET.

We wish all of our customers & friends well at this difficult time and we look forward to hearing from new and old friends over the coming months.

Imperial 284-455AD

Roman Imperial 284-455AD coins for sale. We are looking to buy any collections or individual rarities from the Roman period, Gold Aureus, Carausius denarius to name but a few. Often these do not appear for sale on our site for long so if you collect something specific please do get in touch, similarly if you have coins to sell we'd love to hear from you. Diocletian initiated the ‘tetrachy’ in 293AD, which refers to a governing system of two Augusti and two Caesars, and also carried out a much needed reform of the monetary system. In 295AD, the follis was introduced intended to replace the sestertius; the reverse type of ‘Genio Populi Romani’ being extensively issued into the Constantinian period when a series of smaller bronzes dominated the monetary system under rising inflation, the series referred to as ‘AEs’. The follis reappeared later in the fourth century. Likewise, the short-lived silver argenteus, was issued as a replacement for the antoninianus, and valued at one hundred denarii. Diocletian’s successors failed to keep this monetary system intact. In Constantine’s subsequent monetary reform of 312AD, the gold aureus was replaced by the gold solidus, to consolidate the basis of the currency once again. The miliarense and siliqua appeared at this time as part of the reforms. During the Constantinian period and beyond, the imperial portrait was still the dominant feature of the coinage, though more stylized. Reverse types typically reflect, for example, the glory of the Roman army, vows for the continuity of Imperial rule, and the ongoing struggle against barbarians on the frontiers. Following the Edict of Milan, also in 312AD, legalizing Christian worship, the Christian monogram begins to appear on coins, the Greek letters ‘chi’ and ‘rho’ superimposed, sometimes on a standard, beginning with Constantine I; later combined with the alpha and omega, as seen under Constantius II and Magnentius. Christianity and paganism were portrayed alongside each other, though it is noteworthy that the coinage of Julian II was dominated by a range of pagan types. In 330AD, Constantinople, formerly ancient Byzantium, was designated the new capital of the Roman Empire. After 360AD, the gold solidus, and in the 380’s, the tremissis (third solidus), increased in use as a result of greater gold availability. The full development of the Christian tradition in coinage followed during the Byzantine period.

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Decentius Bronze Double Centenionalis 350-353AD Decentius Bronze Double Centenionalis 350-353AD
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Constans Bronze Centenionalis 337-350AD Trier Constans Bronze Centenionalis 337-350AD Trier