Login/Register |My Account
My Basket (0 items)basket_icon
Menu

Corona Virus Update

Buying from us

We continue to operate here at Silbury Coins in these unprecedented times, albeit working from home. You can still buy items on our website as usual. Shipping may take a little longer as we are making less trips to the post office and some postal services are operating a reduced service. We will keep you updated at every step of the order/shipping process.

We are closely monitoring the postal service and will update on any changes, if you'd prefer we can safely store your items until a later date, just ask.

Selling to us

We are still buying single items and collections by post. If you’d prefer you can send pictures via email, phone or WhatsApp for a rough valuation first. To sell items please send them to us using Royal Mail Special Delivery (available at any post office, both insured and tracked). Please package well and include your contact details, we will be in touch when your package arrives with an exact price. If this is acceptable we will pay you by direct bank transfer, if not we will return the items to you via the same method of post.

Email: info@silburycoins.com Phone 01242 898107 / 07793 676309 WhatsApp 07793 676309 Post Po Box 281, Cirencester, Glos, GL7 9ET.

We wish all of our customers & friends well at this difficult time and we look forward to hearing from new and old friends over the coming months.

Plantagenet Kings 1154-1399AD

Medieval Plantagenet Kings coins for sale. The Plantagenet family held the English throne from 1154AD, with the accession of Henry II, until 1485AD, when Richard III died at the Battle of Bosworth. Throughout the dynasty, the penny continued to form the basis of the currency. Henry II introduced the Tealby penny as a new standard to restore public confidence in the currency following civil war, with nearly thirty mints involved. The mint and the moneyer were shown on the reverse of the coin. In 1180, the Tealby coinage was replaced by the short cross coinage, which again underwent a re-coinage in 1205 under king John, but remained until 1247 in the reign of Henry III, all coins carrying the name 'Henricus' on the obverse. A mint at Rhuddlan castle in Wales also struck short cross coinage under Henry II and III, John and Richard I. Henry III Introduced the long cross coinage in 1247 to try and prevent the practice of clipping, the removal of silver from the edge of the coin. 20 mints were involved with varied activity during the period. Pennies continued to be struck in the name of Henry during the first seven years of Edward I's reign, and in 1279 a re-coinage took place. Pennies, halfpence and fathings were issued and for the first time the groat (four pence) was issued until 1282, these early examples being scarce and desirable. Pennies and small change continued to be issued under Edward II. In 1344, during the reign of Edward III , a gold florin (or leopard) coinage was introduced, based on the french currency system, but replaced later that year by the heavier gold noble and its fractions. The silver groat was re-introduced in 1351. Following the treaty with France, a mint was also operational in Calais from1363, which closed under Henry IV, re-opening late during Henry V's kingship. The weight standard for gold and silver remained the same during the reign of Richard II.

Items 1 to 40 of 66 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2

Set Descending Direction

Items 1 to 40 of 66 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2

Set Descending Direction
New Items recently added to this category...
Edward I Silver Halfpenny 1272-1307AD London Edward I Silver Halfpenny 1272-1307AD London
Henry III Silver Penny 1216-1272AD Canterbury Henry III Silver Penny 1216-1272AD Canterbury
Henry III Silver Penny 1216-1272AD London Henry III Silver Penny 1216-1272AD London